Conference of German-Australian History and Heritage 2018: Australisches Deutschtum

17 August 2018 09:00 to 19 August 2018 17:00 (Australia/Adelaide)

University of Adelaide, Australia

In search of my Prussian great grandfather

  • Peter Brinkworth
  • 18 August 2018 11:30
  • Rumours Room

A presentation on the process used to discover the life and times of the presenter's great grandfather (Ernst Siekmann) who came to South Australia in 1853. He was not aware of his existence until 1978 when a brief description of his life was published in a book of my (Brinkworth) family history. There were some obvious errors, and in 1980 Peter began to investigate Ernst's origins. It was not until 2002, when Peter had retired, that he began his quest to discover who Ernst was. That quest took ...

GAGHA projects: What, why and how

  • Benjamin Hollister
  • 18 August 2018 13:30
  • W P Rogers Room

A major aim of the German-Australian Genealogy and History Alliance is to ensure that research continues and that information and findings are available as widely as possible. This session will review the current set of projects being managed by GAGHA including: Heimat Adelaide German-Australians soldiers, sailors and nurses in WWI German name changes 1788-1958 Catalog of German-Australian family histories and biographies ...

Johannes Menge: More than ‘The Father of South Australian Mineralogy’

  • Bernard O'Neil
  • 19 August 2018 14:00
  • W P Rogers Room

Johannes Menge was perhaps the most extraordinary character to reside in South Australia during its first 15 years of European settlement. Brilliant, erudite, eccentric, visionary and opinionated are some of the words used to describe this unusual mineralogist, linguist and philosopher. Though often portrayed as a drifter and a loner, Menge was a friendly, harmless soul of high intelligence who considered he was on a lifelong religious or mystical journey to a higher authority. His mineralogical...

Workshop: Mapping German South Australia

  • Migration Museum
  • 17 August 2018 09:00
  • Migration Museum

In this workshop participants will explore German South Australia in the nineteenth century through an interactive and collaborative (analogue) mapping exercise. Join Migration Museum curators and share histories and stories of people and families, anchoring them in place and time. We’re hoping to use the knowledge brought into the room to make particular and personal the patterns of settlement of those from the German states who came to South Australia, in the process questioning assumptions an...

The Biography of a German Chair: an object revealing trans-national connections and stories

  • Christeen Schoepf
  • 18 August 2018 13:30
  • Eclipse Room

The biography of the Mayoral chair of Port Pirie, South Australia, can tell the history of that locality. Through further examination of the people and events that have shared this biography, many stories can be told: German migration to the state; trans-national shipping; Hanseatic ship building; German forestry and timber movements; and, even legends of the Teutonic people. How? This chair was crafted from the remnants of the German barque Saturn by a German who had made a new life in South Au...

The Great War and the treatment of German-Australians in South Australia 1914-1922

  • Michael Wohltmann
  • 18 August 2018 16:00
  • Eclipse Room

How could it be that German-Australians, who were viewed as zealous hard working and model citizens prior to the Great War were five years later, treated as outcasts in their own society?  Can these events be explained simply as war hysteria, or were there other factors at work? When the Great War ended in 1918, it was not the end for the German-Australian Community .In fact, things only became worse for the German-Australians in the post-war period. This talk will focus on the phenomenon of i...

Recording German speakers in the Barossa and beyond: Maintaining and renewing a heritage language

  • Peter Mickan
  • 18 August 2018 16:00
  • W P Rogers Room

German speaking immigrants settled the Barossa and regional South Australia in the mid 19 th century. German was the community language for social, business, education and cultural purposes. The Lutheran communitiesbuilt churches,established German schools and colleges,and conducted religious and social activities in German.However, the impact of two World Wars and dominance of English resulted in the dramatic retraction of German from the middle of the twentieth century. Children were warned no...

Heimat Adelaide: Mapping German locations in the city

  • Benjamin Hollister
  • 19 August 2018 10:50
  • Eclipse Room

German heritage is easy to see in places such as Westgarthtown, Hahndorf and Bethany, but in the larger cities of Australia it is sometimes swallowed up and covered over. 'Heimat Adelaide' is the result of researching Germans using council assessment books, directories, and city survey maps and locating the areas of German work, life and recreation. It is also the work of many volunteer transcribers who have given their time. ...

Power behind the pulpit – the Pastor’s wife

  • David Sweet
  • 19 August 2018 15:30
  • Eclipse Room

Eleven hours of interviews and ninety thousand words transcribed provides a rich and thick oral history of a Pastor’s wife. Vida Heinrich (1930-2016) was raised, went to school and married in Freeling (SA). She was the second eldest of five children to fourth generation (immigrant) German farmers. At twenty-one, (1951), she married recently ordained Lutheran Pastor, Dudley Liebelt and moved to outback Queensland. The role of a pastor’s wife in the second half of the 20th century was not easy. He...